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The Daily
Monday - Friday from 6:30pm - 7:00pm

This is how the news should sound. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise and powered by New York Times journalism.

  • A jury on Tuesday found Hunter Biden, President Biden’s son, guilty of three felonies related to the purchase of a gun at one of the low points of his troubled life.Katie Rogers, a White House correspondent for The Times, explains what the verdict could mean for the 2024 presidential race.Guest: Katie Rogers, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Mr. Biden was found guilty on charges related to a gun purchase in 2018.Here are some takeaways from the conviction.The president has grown more resigned and afraid about his son’s future, according to people close to the Bidens.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • Last week, President Biden announced one of the most restrictive immigration policies by a Democratic incumbent in decades, effectively barring migrants crossing the southern border from seeking asylum in the United States.Zolan Kanno-Youngs, a White House correspondent for The Times, explains the thinking behind the move.Guest: Zolan Kanno-Youngs, a White House correspondent for The New York Times.Background reading: Biden’s executive order is an eye-catching election-year move intended to ease pressure on the immigration system and address a major concern among voters.Watch a short video detailing the key facts behind the immigration order.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • On Wednesday, Gov. Kathy Hochul of New York announced that she was indefinitely halting a project that had been decades in the making: congestion pricing in Manhattan’s core business district.Ana Ley, who covers mass transit in New York City, and Grace Ashford, who covers politics in New York, discuss why New York hit the brakes on congestion pricing.Guest: Ana Ley, who covers mass transit in New York City for The New York Times.Grace Ashford, a reporter covering New York government and politics for The New York Times.Background reading: How Ms. Hochul decided to kill congestion pricing in New York.Is New York’s Economy too fragile for congestion pricing? Many say no.How would congestion pricing have worked in New York City?For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • In a broken world, what can we gain by looking another animal in the eye? "Animal" is a six-part, round-the-world journey in search of an answer. In Episode 2, the writer Sam Anderson travels to Iceland to rescue baby puffins — which are called, adorably, pufflings.For more on "Animal," visit nytimes.com/animal.
  • The actress is taking on serious roles, trying to overcome self-doubt and sharing more about her personal life — but she’s not done being funny.
  • Warning: this episode contains strong language, descriptions of explicit content and sexual harassmentA disturbing new problem is sweeping American schools: Students are using artificial intelligence to create sexually explicit images of their classmates and then share them without the person depicted even knowing.Natasha Singer, who covers technology, business and society for The Times, discusses the rise of deepfake nudes and one girl's fight to stop them.Guest: Natasha Singer, a reporter covering technology, business and society for The New York Times.Background reading: Using artificial intelligence, middle and high school students have fabricated explicit images of female classmates and shared the doctored pictures.Spurred by teenage girls, states have moved to ban deepfake nudes.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • At the height of the Covid pandemic, nearly 200 countries started negotiating a plan to ensure they would do better when the next pandemic inevitably arrived. Their deadline for that plan was last week.Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The Times, explains why, so far, the negotiations have failed.Guest: Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter for The New York Times.Background reading: Countries failed to agree on a treaty to prepare the world for the next pandemic before a major international meeting.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • In an unexpected speech last week, President Biden revealed the details of a secret proposal intended to end the war in Gaza. Perhaps the most surprising thing was where that proposal had come from.Isabel Kershner, a reporter for The Times in Jerusalem, explains Mr. Biden’s gambit and the difficult choice it presents for Israel’s leader, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.Guest: Isabel Kershner, who covers Israeli and Palestinian affairs for The New York Times.Background reading: Mr. Biden called for an end to the war in Gaza, endorsing an Israeli cease-fire proposal.Mr. Netanyahu answered the call for a truce by insisting on the “destruction” of Hamas.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • Five years ago, a TV personality and comedian, Volodymyr Zelensky, won the presidency in Ukraine in a landslide victory. When Russia launched a full-scale invasion of the country three years later, he faced the biggest challenge of his presidency and of his life. Despite initial success beating back one of the world’s largest armies, the tide has turned against him.Andrew E. Kramer, the Kyiv bureau chief for The Times, sat down with Mr. Zelensky to discuss the war, and how it might end.Guest: Andrew E. Kramer, the Kyiv bureau chief for The New York Times.Background reading: Read The New York Times’s interview with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine.Explaining the debate over Ukraine’s use of Western weapons.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.
  • Last week, Donald J. Trump became the first U.S. former president to be convicted of a crime when a jury found that he had falsified business records to conceal a sex scandal.Maggie Haberman, a senior political correspondent for The Times, and Reid J. Epstein, who also covers politics, discuss how the conviction might shape the remaining months of the presidential race.Guest: Nate Cohn, who is the chief political analyst for The New York Times.Maggie Haberman, a senior political correspondent for The New York Times.Reid J. Epstein, who covers politics for The New York Times.Background reading: The political fallout is far from certain, but the verdict will test America’s traditions and legal institutions.Watch a video analysis of whether this newfound moment sticks politically.Democrats are pushing President Biden to make Mr. Trump’s felonies a top 2024 issue.For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Transcripts of each episode will be made available by the next workday.